A Love Letter to Hardbacks…

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Booking Through Thursday asked an interesting question this morning. The question was:

All other things being equal, what is your favorite format for reading? Hardcover? Paperback? New book? Old book? Leather-bound first edition? E-book?

 

Many charity shops find it difficult to sell hardback fiction – a fact that I find quite shocking! I love my beautiful hardbacks and will always buy a hardback version of a book I already have if I find one. There’s something satisfying about sitting with a thick hardback book on your knee and getting absorbed into the story. One author I always love in hardback is Stephen King and I will happily pay the £25 rather than waiting for the £6.99 paperback! If people prefer to buy paperbacks in charity shops though then all the more for me.

What is your favourite format for reading?

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Booking Through Thursday – Winter

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It’s the depth of winter here where I live right now … what books do you like to read when it’s snowy and white? What books do you read to evoke a real feeling of winter (good or bad)?

Booking Through Thursday is a weekly meme about books and reading. Every week a question is asked which can be answered on your own blog. This week’s question can be seen above. It is about what books you prefer to read in winter.

Below I’ve listed the books that I like to read around winter/Christmas time.

 Hogfather – Terry Pratchett

This is a Christmas must read for me! This is the 20th novel in the Discworld series and is focused on my favourite character in the series (Death).

“It’s the night before Hogswatch. And its too quiet.

Where is the big jolly fat man? Why is Death creeping down chimneys and trying to say Ho Ho Ho? The darkest night of the year is getting a lot darker…

Susan the gothic governess has got to sort it out by morning, otherwise there won’t be a morning. Ever again…The 20th Discworld novel is a festive feast of darkness and Death (but with jolly robins and tinsel too).

As they say: ‘You’d better watch out…'”

 

A Christmas Carol and Other Christmas Writings – Charles Dickens

I bought this beautiful hardback book last Christmas when I was working at Waterstones. I used to read a copy of A Christmas Carol every Christmas but now I’ve got a beautiful version to read. It’s good to read the lesser known Christmas stories as well. Dickens just screams Christmas to me.

“Dicken’s Christmas writings-in a new, sumptuous, and delightful clothbound edition.

Dickens’s classic A Christmas Carol has had significant influence on our ideas about the Christmas spirit, and the season as a time for celebration, charity, and memory. This handsome edition features appendices on A Christmas Carol and The Haunted Man, an essay on Dickens and The Arabian Nights, and Dickens’s prefaces to the collected editions of the Christmas books.”

 The Snow Child – Eowyn Ivey

 This is a beautiful story set in the snowy Alaska woods. Perfect for winter.

“Alaska, 1920: a brutal place to homestead, and especially tough for recent arrivals Jack and Mabel. Childless, they are drifting apart–he struggling to maintain the farm; she crumbling from loneliness and despair. In a moment of levity during the first snowfall, they build a child out of snow. The next morning the snow child is gone–but they glimpse a young girl running through the trees.
This little girl, who calls herself Faina, seems to be a child of the woods. She hunts with a red fox at her side and somehow survives alone in the Alaskan wilderness. As Jack and Mabel come to understand this child who could have stepped from the pages of a fairy tale, they begin to love her as their own daughter. But in this beautiful, violent territory things are rarely as they appear, and what they eventually learn about Faina will transform them all.”

What books do you read in the winter?